World No Tobacco Day 2020

World No Tobacco Day Observed on 31st May

World No Tobacco Day is one of eight official global public health campaigns marked by the WHO, along with World Health Day, World Blood Donor Day, World Immunization Week, World Tuberculosis Day, World Malaria Day, World Hepatitis Day, and World AIDS Day.

World No Tobacco Day Observed on 31st May

Top Current Affairs 1st June 2020

Source | News18


GS Paper II: Important International institutions, agencies and fora- their structure, mandate.



World No Tobacco Day 2020

Key Takeaways

  • World No Tobacco Day (WNTD) is observed around the world every year on 31 May.
  • THEME 2020: “Tobacco and related industry tactics to attract younger generations”
  • World No Tobacco Day is one of eight official global public health campaigns marked by the WHO, along with World Health Day, World Blood Donor Day, World Immunization Week, World Tuberculosis Day, World Malaria Day, World Hepatitis Day, and World AIDS Day.

Read More: International Nurses Day Celebrated on 12th May


Context: World No Tobacco Day was observed on May 31 to debunk myths and expose devious tactics employed by Tobacco industries.

  • THEME 2020: “Tobacco and related industry tactics to attract younger generations”


Key Highlights of World No Tobacco Day

  • World No Tobacco Day (WNTD) is observed around the world every year on 31 May.
  • The Member States of the World Health Organization created World No Tobacco Day in 1987 to draw global attention to the tobacco epidemic and the preventable death and disease it causes.
  • World No Tobacco Day is one of eight official global public health campaigns marked by the WHO, along with World Health Day, World Blood Donor Day, World Immunization Week, World Tuberculosis Day, World Malaria Day, World Hepatitis Day, and World AIDS Day.
  • In 2016, on World No Tobacco Day, the World Health Organization (WHO) called on governments to get ready for plain packaging of tobacco products.
  • In 2017, the focus was ‘A threat to development’.
  • In 2018, the focus was ‘Tobacco breaks hearts: choose health, not tobacco’ #NoTobacco.
  • In 2019, the focus is on ‘Tobacco and lung health’.
  • In 2020, the focus is on ‘Tobacco and related industry tactics to attract younger generations’.

Read More: WORLD MALARIA DAY 2020



Regulation in India

A nationwide smoke-free law pertaining to public places came into effect from 2 October 2008. Places where smoking is restricted include auditoriums, movie theatres, hospitals, public transport (aircraft, buses, trains, metros, monorails, taxis, autos) and their related facilities (airports, bus stands/stations, railway stations), restaurants, hotels, bars, pubs, amusement centres, offices (government and private), libraries, courts, post offices, markets, shopping malls, canteens, refreshment rooms, banquet halls, discothèques, coffee houses, educational institutions and parks.

  • Smoking is allowed on roads, inside one’s home or vehicle.
  • Smoking is also permitted in airports, restaurants, bars, pubs, discothèques and some other enclosed workplaces if they provide designated separate smoking areas.
  • Anybody violating this law will be charged with a fine of Rs 200.
  • The sale of tobacco products within 100 metres of educational institutions is also prohibited. This particular rule is strictly enforced.
  • Further as of 2014, there is strict provision of imprisonment for selling tobacco products to any person aged below 18 years of age .
  • The Cable Television Network (Regulation) Amendment Bill, in force since 8 September 2000, completely prohibits cigarette and alcohol advertisements.

Also Read: WORLD MIGRATORY BIRD DAY 2020



How are tobacco and related industries manipulating youth?

  • Use of flavours that are attractive to youth in tobacco and nicotine products, like cherry, bubble gum and cotton candy, which encourages young people to underestimate the related health risks and to start using them
  • Sleek designs and attractive products, which can also be easy to carry and are deceptive (e.g. products shaped like a USB stick or candy)
  • Promotion of products as “reduced harm” or “cleaner” alternatives to conventional cigarettes in the absence of objective science substantiating these claims
  • Celebrity/influencer sponsorships and brand sponsored contests to promote tobacco and nicotine products (e.g. Instagram influencers)
  • Point-of-sale marketing at vendor outlets frequented by children, including positioning near sweets, snacks or soda and providing premiums for vendors to ensure their products are displayed near venues frequented by young people (includes providing marketing materials and display cases to retailers)
  • Sale of single stick cigarettes and other tobacco and nicotine products near schools, which makes it cheap and easy for school children to access tobacco and nicotine products
  • Indirect marketing of tobacco products in movies, TV shows and online streaming shows
  • Tobacco vending machines at venues frequented by young people, covered in attractive advertising and pack displays, and undermining regulations on sales to minors
  • Litigation to weaken all kinds of tobacco control regulations including warning labels, display at point of sale, and regulations that limit access and marketing to children (specifically provisions to ban the sale and advertising of tobacco products near schools)

Also Read: World Red Cross Day | Explained



Salient Features “Responsible AI for Youth” Program

  • The National Programme is open to students of classes 8 – 12 from Central and State government-run schools (including KVS, NVS, JNV) from across the country – all 28 States and 8 Union Territories.
  • It aims to bring about a change in the thought process and create a bridge for the digital divide.
  • The Program will be implemented in a phase-wise manner.
    • In its first phase, each of the State Education Department will nominate 10 teachers as per the eligibility criteria.
    • Teachers may also self nominate themselves by fulfilling the eligibility criteria.
    • These teachers will be provided orientation sessions aimed to help them understand the premise and identify 25-50 potential students for the Program.
    • The identified students will attend online training sessions on AI and understand how to identify social impact ideas/projects that may be created using AI.
    • They are also to submit their ideas through a 60 seconds video explaining a proposed AI enabled solution.
  • From the submitted ideas in the form of videos, top 100 ideas will be shortlisted and these students will be invited to attend residential boot camps or online sessions (subject to COVID-19 situation); to take them through a deep dive AI journey.
  • Post the boot-camps/ online sessions, these students will be asked to create real time projects and submit their final project in a video format on the website.
  • Adequate handholding will be provided by Intel certified AI coaches and mentors throughout to ensure that ideas mature as prototypes.
  • The experts will shortlist top 50 project ideas and students will be invited to showcase their projects either face to face or in an online format.
  • Further, top 20 innovative projects will be selected by an independent committee of experts and provided opportunities to showcase at relevant platform.


Also Read: WORLD PRESS FREEDOM DAY


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