Science Technology & Innovation Policy 2020

Science Technology & Innovation Policy : STIP 2020

This 2020 edition of the Science Technology and Innovation Policy will be six-months long and has been organised into 4 highly interlinked tracks.

Science Technology & Innovation Policy : STIP 2020

Top Current Affairs 3rd June 2020

Source | Press Information Bureau


GS Paper II: Government policies and interventions for development in various sectors and issues arising out of their design and implementation.



Science Technology & Innovation Policy 2020

Key Takeaways

  • This 2020 edition of the Science Technology and Innovation Policy will be six-months long and has been organised into 4 highly interlinked tracks.
  • will be the 5th STIP of India and is being formulated at a crucial juncture when India and the world are tackling the Covid-19.

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Context: New National Science Technology and Innovation Policy (STIP 2020) has been recently released by the Office of the Principal Scientific Adviser to the Government of India (Office of PSA) and the Department of Science and Technology (DST).

  • The Office of Principal Scientific Adviser to the Government of India ( PSA’s Office) was set-up in November 1999 by the Cabinet Secretariat with the following objectives:
    • To evolve policies, strategies and missions for the generation of innovations and support systems for multiple applications.
    • To generate science and technology tasks in critical infrastructure, economic and social sectors in partnership with Government departments, institutions and industry.
    • To function as the Secretariat to the Scientific Advisory Committee to the Cabinet, with the Principal Scientific Adviser to the Government of India as its Chairman.
  • The Prime Minister’s Science, Technology and Innovation Advisory Council (PM-STIAC) is an overarching council that facilitates the PSA’s office.


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What you need to know about the Science Technology & Innovation Policy (STIP 2020)?

Science Technology & Innovation Policy (STIP 2020) will be the 5th STIP of India and is being formulated at a crucial juncture when India and the world are tackling the Covid-19.

The Policy will integrate the lessons of the pandemic including the building of an Atmanirbhar Bharat by leveraging India’s strengths in research and development, design, science and technology workforce and institutions, huge markets, demographic dividend, diversity and data.

This 2020 edition of the Science Technology and Innovation Policy will be six-months long and has been organised into 4 highly interlinked tracks. The details of these tracks are as follows:

  • First Track or Track I: This track involves an extensive public and expert consultation process through Science Policy Forum, a dedicated platform for soliciting inputs from larger public and expert pools during and after the policy drafting process.
  • Second Track or Track II: This track comprises experts-driven thematic consultations to feed evidence-informed recommendations into the policy drafting process.
    • 21 focused thematic groups have been constituted for this purpose.
  • Third Track or Track III: This track involves extensive intra-state and intra-department consultation with Ministries and States.
  • Fourth Track or Track IV: This track constitutes an apex level multi-stakeholder consultation.


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A look into the previous four editions of Science, Technology & Innovation Policies

Scientific Policy Resolution of 1958

  • India’s first major science policy can be traced back to the year 1958.
  • It was the first science policy that largely emphasized on basic research in almost every field of science.
  • The policy also put emphasis on developing and making available the basic infrastructure for the development of scientific research.
  • SPR 1958 laid the foundation of the scientific enterprise and scientific temper in India.

Technology Policy Statement 1983:

The primary feature of TPS 1983 which was the second edition of the technology policy, was technological self-reliance through promotion and development of indigenous technologies.

  • Adoption of indigenous technology would reduce vulnerabilities in critical areas and would help maximise the utilisation of local (human and material) resources.


Read More: ATAL INNOVATION MISSION


Science and Technology Policy 2003:

The major aim of the Technology Policy 2003 was to keep up the pace with science and technology, to stay competitive in an increasingly globalised world and to meet the primary goal of equitable and sustainable development.

  • It called to invest heavily in the research and development sector with the aim of increasing investment to 2% of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP).

Science, Technology and Innovation Policy 2013:

The decade of 2010 to 2020 was declared as a decade of innovation. It was acknowledged that in order to stay globally competitive, it was necessary to make a transition into a knowledge-based economy.

  • This policy document was a step in the direction towards building a robust national innovation ecosystem. This policy ensures faster, sustainable, and inclusive development of the people.
  • By 2013, Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) became the major drivers of national development.
  • The paradigm set by the policy of 2013 is “Science technology and innovation for the people.”

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