NATIONAL TECHNOLOGY DAY

National Technology Day Celebrated

The scientists of Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) were addressed on the occasion of National Technology Day (NTD).

National Technology Day Celebrated

GS Paper III: Science and Technology – developments and their applications and effects in everyday life Achievements of Indians in science & technology; indigenization of technology and developing new technology.

Context: The scientists of Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) were addressed on the occasion of National Technology Day (NTD) through video conferencing.



Details About National Technology Day

NATIONAL TECHNOLOGY DAY

The Indian government has officially declared 11 May as National Technology Day in India to commemorate the first of the five nuclear tests that were carried out on 11 May 1998.

  • It was officially signed by then-Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee in 1998 and the day is celebrated by giving awards to various individuals and industries in the field of science and technology.
  • This year, the focus will be on rebooting the economy through Science and Technology.

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Historical Perspective of the Day

On May 11, 1998, India successfully carried out nuclear tests at Pokhran. The first indigenous aircraft “Hansa-3” was test flown at Bangalore on this day; and India also performed successful test firing of the Trishul missile on the same day. Since 1999, the day is being celebrated as National Technology Day.



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PRELIMS Background Bites


About Pokhran Test

  • Pokhran II (also known as Operation Shakti) is the name which was assigned to the series of five nuclear bomb test explosions conducted by India at the Indian Army’s Pokhran Test Range in May 1998.
  • It was on May 11, 1998, India carried out three nuclear tests. After 2 days, India carried out two more tests. Of the five detonations, the first was a fusion bomb and the remaining four were fission bombs.
  • Subsequently, the then Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee declared India a full-fledged nuclear state.
  • It was the second Indian nuclear test; the first test, code-named Smiling Buddha, was conducted in 1974.
  • The tests achieved their main objective of giving India the capability to build fission and thermonuclear weapons with yields up to 200 Kilotons.
  • The then Chairman of the Indian Atomic Energy Commission described each one of the explosions of Pokhran-II to be “equivalent to several tests carried out by other nuclear weapon states over decades”.
  • Many names have been assigned to these tests; originally these were collectively called Operation Shakti–98, and the five nuclear bombs were designated Shakti-I through to Shakti-V.
  • More recently, the operation as a whole has come to be known as Pokhran II, and the 1974 explosion as Pokhran-I.

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