BS VI Emission Norms

BS VI Emission Norms | What you need to know?

Both BS-IV and BS-VI are unit emission norms that set the maximum permissible levels for pollutants that an automotive or a two-wheeler exhaust can emit.

BS VI Emission Norms | What you need to know?

Source | Press Information Bureau



GS Paper III: Conservation, environmental pollution and degradation, environmental impact assessment.


BS VI Emission Norms

Key Takeaways

  • Bharat stage (BS) emission standards are laid down by the government to regulate the output of air pollutants from internal combustion engine and spark-ignition engine equipment, including motor vehicles.
  • The first emission norms were introduced in India in 1991 for petrol and in 1992 for diesel vehicles.

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Context: The Ministry of Road Transport and Highways has issued notification regarding the emission norms for L7 (Quadricycle) category for BS VI.

  • This notification completes the process of BS VI for all L, M and N category vehicles in India.

What you need to know about Bharat stage (BS) emission standards norms?

Bharat stage (BS) emission standards are laid down by the government of India to regulate the output of air pollutants from internal combustion engine and spark-ignition engine equipment, including motor vehicles.

As mandated by the central government, vehicle makers must manufacture, sell and register only BS-VI vehicles from April 1, 2020.

The first emission norms were introduced in India in 1991 for petrol and in 1992 for diesel vehicles. Followed these, the catalytic converter became mandatory for petrol vehicles and unleaded petrol was introduced in the market.


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What is the difference between BS-IV and BS-VI Emission norms?

Both BS-IV and BS-VI are unit emission norms that set the maximum permissible levels for pollutants that an automotive or a two-wheeler exhaust can emit.

  • As compared to the BS-IV, BS-VI emission standards are much stricter.
  • BS-VI fuel has lower sulphur content than BSIV, fuel.
  • The sulphur content in BS-VI fuel is five times lower (10ppm) as compared to sulphur content in BS-IV fuel (50ppm). And, the nitrogen oxide level for the BS-VI diesel engine and petrol engine will be brought down by 70% and 25%


Background of Bharat Stage Emission Norms

The abbreviation BS, refers to ‘Bharat Stage’. It is prefixed to the iteration of the actual emission norms. The primary Bharat Stage rules were introduced in the year 2000, with the second and third iterations being introduced in 2001 and 2005 as BSII and BSIII respectively.

The fourth iteration, BSIV, was introduced in 2017 and therefore the delay between the introduction of BSIII and BSIV resulted in fast-tracking the BSVI emission norms rather than BSV norms.

According to the Supreme Court ruling on 29 April 1999, all vehicles in the country had to meet Euro I or India 2000 norms by June 1, 1999, and Euro II would be mandatory in the National Capital Region (NCR) from April 2000.

  • Carmakers were not prepared for this transition and in a subsequent judgment, the implementation of Euro II was deferred.

In 2002, the government accepted the report submitted by the Mashelkar committee, which proposed a road map for the rollout of Euro-based emission norms in India. It also recommended a phased implementation of future norms, with regulations being implemented in major cities first and extended to the rest of the country after a few years.

  • Based on the recommendations of the committee, the National Auto Fuel policy was announced officially in 2003.
  • The road map for the implementation of the BS norms was laid out until 2010.
  • The policy also created guidelines for auto fuels, reduction of pollution from older vehicles and R&D for air quality data creation and health administration.

The standards and the timeline for implementation are set by the Central Pollution Control Board under the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change.

  • Since October 2010, Bharat Stage (BS) III norms were enforced across the country.
  • BS-IV emission norms were put in place in 13 major cities from April 2010, and the entire country from April 2017.
  • In 2016, the government announced that the country would skip the BS-V norms altogether and adopt BS-VI norms by 2020.

According to a recent judgment, the Supreme Court banned the sale and registration of motor vehicles conforming to Bharat Stage IV emission standard in the entire country from 1 April 2020.

On 15 November 2017, the Union petroleum ministry, in consultation with public oil marketing companies, decided to bring forward the date of BS-VI grade auto fuels in NCT of Delhi with effect from 1 April 2018, instead of 1 April 2020.


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What you need to know about the various vehicle categories in India?

  1. L Category Vehicles: Motor vehicles with less than four wheels [but does include light four-wheelers]. It has further seven sub-categories form L1-L7.
  2. M Category Vehicles: Vehicles having at least four wheels and used for the carriage of passengers (e.g., standard car with 2, 3, 4 doors). It has further three sub-categories form M1-M3.
  3. N Category Vehicles: Power-driven vehicles having at least four wheels and used for the carriage of goods. It has further three sub-categories form N1-N3.
  4. O Category Vehicles: A trailer is an unpowered vehicle towed by a powered vehicle. It is commonly used for the transport of goods and materials. It has further four sub-categories form O1-O4.
  5. T Category Vehicles: Agricultural and Forestry tractors
  6. G Category Vehicles: Off-road vehicles


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